Down in history

From the north-east, where 850,000-year-old footprints were found, to the north-west, where a ring of timbers was dated to 2049 BC, North Norfolk’s rich heritage is well documented. Among the many historic places visitors can still enjoy today are: Castles, such as Castle Rising, near King’s Lynn – one of the most famous 12th century castles in England, its stone keep is among the finest surviving examples of its kind Manor houses, such as Baconsthorpe Castle, near Holt – a moated and fortified 15th century manor house, with a gatehouse thought to have been built during the Wars of the Roses Round-towered churches – …

All seasons

Roe deer, Caister St Edmund, Elizabeth Dack, 3 July 2014

When it comes to wildlife in North Norfolk, there is always something to see AUTUMN See if you can spot Roe deer – the males have relatively short antlers, typically with six points, which they begin to grow in November. Slender, medium-sized deer, with no tail, they are mostly brown in colour. They have a paler, buff patch around the rump. Roe deer live in areas of mixed countryside, with farmland, grassland, heathland and woodland. Photograph of roe deer, Caister St Edmund by Elizabeth Dack Also look out for Hornet mimic hoverfly – as its name suggests, it is an excellent mimic of the …

Beautiful Burnham Market

Situated just a short distance from some of North Norfolk’s most spectacular beaches, Burnham Market is a vibrant and attractive village. Close to the mouth of the River Burn, from which it is likely to have taken its name, it is one of the Burnham villages, which also include Burnham Thorpe, Burnham Overy Town, Burnham Overy Staithe, Burnham Norton and Burnham Deepdale. Set around a central green, Burnham Market is known for its array of local independent shops, boutiques and galleries. And, from fresh, seasonal produce and bouquets of flowers to clothing, art, furniture and even hardware, there are independent businesses that cater …

Into the woods

Enjoy the glorious and varied colours of the seasons as you take a walk through some of North Norfolk’s enchanting woodland Foxley Wood, at Foxley, is Norfolk’s largest remaining ancient woodland. Look out for the pale-yellow primroses in early spring and then the carpets of bluebells from mid-April through to early May. At Thursford Wood, near Little Snoring, the spring colour is followed by summer ferns and the autumnal hues of the oak trees, some of which are believed to be over 500 years old. Bacton Woods date back to Saxon times and present glorious greens within conifer plantation, mixed woodland and open …

Vibrant Holt

CREDIT: TOUR NORFOLK

Packed with exciting shops, restaurants and tea rooms, the bustling market town of Holt is the perfect place to browse, relax and stock up on local produce. The name Holt is thought to come from the Saxon word meaning “woodland,” and there are still many wooded areas surrounding the town today, including beautiful Holt Country Park. Holt has an attractive centre, with lots of small lanes and yards to discover. These are home to charity and second-hand shops, as well as outlets selling beautifully crafted pottery, furniture and other items. There are several art galleries, as well as boutiques, bookshops and antiques’ …

The art of architecture

Royal Arcade, Norwich David Edlestone

Victorian and Edwardian architect George John Skipper (1856-1948) was responsible for many of the buildings in Norwich city centre. Famously described by Sir John Betjeman as “to Norwich rather what Gaudi was to Barcelona,” he was born in Dereham and educated in Norwich. Skipper considered architecture to be an art, often employing decorative artists and enjoying using great detail. He liked to emphasise corners where façades met and place turrets on entrance bays. One of his best-known creations in Norwich was Royal Arcade, linking Gentleman’s Walk with Castle Street to provide the elegant Art Nouveau-inspired shopping area which still exists …

Best of all worlds

Take a stroll down Magdalen Street to enjoy a taste of the area dubbed the city’s most multicultural road. Situated in a quarter sometimes known as Norwich-over-the-Water, beyond Tombland and over Fye Bridge, this part of the city was originally call Fybriggate. It is thought that this was where Norwich originally grew as a settlement before spreading across the water towards the Cathedral Quarter. Today, Magdalen Street retains a sense of history, with its varied architecture, but is also very much the essence of what Norwich is proud to be becoming today, a much more diverse city. Wander down Magdalen …

A Unique City

  A wealth of history, a lively arts scene, fantastic food and drink, and superb shopping – Norwich is a city that has it all. Set in the heart of tranquil East Anglia, surrounded by beautiful countryside and not far from the spectacular coast, it is a vibrant hub with much to offer visitors to the area, as well as those living in the city. Norwich grew from a small Anglo-Saxon settlement into a bustling centre for trade and an inland port – and evidence of its long history can still be seen today in its cobbled streets and fascinating architecture. But the …